You Know You are from D.C. If…

U.S. Capitol c. 1980

U.S. Capitol c. 1980, photo by my Dad.

I’ve been seeing various blog and Facebook posts about “You know you’re a Southerner if…” or “You know you’re from Boston if…” I decided to do one for my own “hometown”.

You know you’re from D.C. if:

  • You say you’re from D.C. even if you don’t live there and never have…but you live(d) in the immediate suburbs of Maryland or Virginia—because saying you’re from Falls Church or Chevy Chase nets you only blank looks and comments like, “But you don’t have a Southern accent.” Actually, being from Arlington once got me the aghast question, “Your father is a grave digger?” *sigh* No, there’s more Arlington County than the military cemetery, such as the Pentagon, which employs a whole lot more people. In my case, Dad was military and we had “most consecutive tours” stationed in Arlington, so considered that home.
  • Sentences like: “We need to check on an SCI for a SME seconded over to MilCom before the deliverable drops.” actually make sense without further explanation.
  • “Sorry—stupid Vice Presidential motorcade” is actually a legitimate excuse for being half an hour late for work.
  • In the same vein, you sometimes have to tell the person on the other end of the phone to hold on for a couple of minutes because the sirens from the diplomatic motorcade are drowning out the conversation and you have to wait until the whole thing goes by.
  • Phrases overheard at the grocery store include things like “Yeah, but he’s only a Congressman.”
  • You notice things like the men in dark suits loitering at the restaurant door sporting earwigs and discrete dark canvas gym bags—and know what it means—and your first thought is “Oh, crap, this is going to screw up convenient parking for blocks,” not, “Oh, cool—the First Lady is having lunch here!”
  • You think it’s a bit odd when someone doesn’t have at least a SECRET security clearance.

    Gerald Ford at the White House during a visit.

    Gerald Ford at the White House. Photo by my Dad.

  • You think it’s really odd when someone doesn’t have a passport.
  • You think it’s pretty funny that the eccentric cat lady down the street names her felines after former directors of the CIA. But your college friends think that it’s stranger that you figured that out without being told.
  • You know your obscure dead-end street in the suburbs is always going to be plowed first in a snowstorm—because an assistant postmaster general lives two doors away and is considered Essential Personnel.
  • When your college professor goes on an anti-government rant about the absurd, indecipherable “governmentalese” words and acronyms that Washington uses, and you know all of the acronyms.
  • Being a military brat isn’t all that odd in your schools, because two-thirds of the students there transferred around as much or more than you did—and a question like “What are you?” isn’t actually an insult, but invites answers like “State.” “Army.” “Embassy.” “FBI.” “DEA.” which actually mean you have at least one parent serving in that branch.
  • You realize some of the senior care facilities in the area have “facilities and personnel available” to deal with dementia patients with high-level clearances and “special skills”. Anyone ever wonder what happened if James Bond or Jason Bourne got Alzheimer’s?

Any you would add?

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Washington Loves Readers! Luncheon

 

Goodies from the table authors

Goodies from my table’s authors.

Spent a delightful autumn Saturday with my colleagues from Washington Romance Writers (WRW), the local affiliate chapter of Romance Writers of America (RWA). WRW hosted an appreciation luncheon this weekend [October 11, 2014], with 40 authors mixing with50 bloggers and readers called Washington Loves Readers!

Authors came in from all over—Tracy Brogan from Michigan, P.A. DePaul from Pennsylvania, and so many more—to help celebrate the bloggers and readers who make their success possible. A list of all the participating authors can be found here on the event’s Facebook site.

It was a great afternoon—the food was excellent, with roast chicken, fantastic butternut squash ravioli, and grilled vegetables. Of course, dessert was chocolate cake, because who can argue with chocolate cake!? The luncheon venue was a the cozy upper floor of The Loft at 4935, a restaurant in Bethesda, Maryland, that featured a parking garage right across the street that is free on weekends.

Karna Bodman and Kim Kincaid

Karna Small Bodman explains her raffle basket (held by Kimberly Kincaid).

I attended as a reader and was seated at a table hosted by historical writers Kim Iverson Headlee, Sally MacKenzie, and Anne Barton. Also at our table were two librarians from Maryland and USAToday Happily Ever After (HEA) contributor (and published author) Kathy Altman. Not only did readers and bloggers have a chance to share a table with at least three published authors at their table, but the authors provided goodie bags for their table mates—ranging from signed books, tote bags, picnic baskets, tea cups or mugs brimming with goodies, pens, magnets, and other treats. They also provided centerpieces for the table, showing off the breadth of creativity in the group—it’s worth checking out the Websites or Facebook pages of other attendees and authors to see the array!

Swag from the Gala

Swag from the Gala!

After a cocktail hour for socializing, we settled in for our excellent lunch. Each course was accompanied by a selection of raffle baskets—something our chapter is famous for. Donated by the authors, with help from their friends or, in many cases, their publishers, these were stuffed full of additional goodies. Bottles of wine, tea pots direct from England, pashmina shawls from India, gift cards, tee shirts, and, of course, books. All of the recipients were excited to hear about the raffle selection from the donating author, who explained what was in the bag, box, or basket, as well as why they chose those items. In some cases, there were twenty signed books in the selection!

After lunch, the readers and bloggers had an opportunity to use a gorgeous purple tote bag that was a party favor courtesy of WRW to “trick or treat” at the tables and meet each author and collect a variety of author swag, like note pads, 2015 pocket calendars, calculators, scented soaps, and more. It made for a fun way to visit with authors and learn what they were working on and which books are coming out soon.

Tracy Brogan with fans

Tracy Brogan passing out treats to fans.

Everyone I spoke with said they enjoyed the event, so it’s good to know that the chapter hopes to turn it into an annual or bi-annual affair. I know I’m not the only one who will be looking for further details! Hope to see you at the next one.